Marquis Farrier Service
Doma Vaquera 

   
 
   

What Is Doma Vaquera?

Doma vaquera is the style of riding developed for working cattle ranches and evolved from a style called jinete.  Doma means training, vaquero means cowboy from the Spanish vaca for cow. 
 
Ranching and the cowboy tradition originated in Spain, out of the necessity to handle large herds of grazing animals on dry land from horseback. During the Reconquista, members of the Spanish nobility and various military orders received large land grants that the Kingdom of Castile had conquered from the Moors. These landowners were to defend the lands put into their control and could use them for earning revenue. In the process it was found that open-range breeding of sheep and cattle (under the Mesta system) was the most suitable use for vast tracts, particularly in the parts of Spain now known as Castilla-La Mancha, Extremadura and Andalusia.
 
Over time, most of the cattle ranches in Spain have given way to agriculture, and the few remaining ranches raise fighting bulls. The Spanish vaquero rider more often than not is working with aggressive and dangerous bulls requiring that his skills are carefully honed and his horse is particularly skilled, athletic and brave.    With many of the large ranches disappearing, doma vaquera has been developed into a competitive sport and art form.

Doma Vaquera: a bit of history

Doma vaquera is the style of riding developed for working cattle ranches and evolved from a style called jinete.  Doma means training, vaquero means cowboy from the Spanish vaca for cow. 
 
Ranching and the cowboy tradition originated in Spain, out of the necessity to handle large herds of grazing animals on dry land from horseback. During the Reconquista, members of the Spanish nobility and various military orders received large land grants that the Kingdom of Castile had conquered from the Moors. These landowners were to defend the lands put into their control and could use them for earning revenue. In the process it was found that open-range breeding of sheep and cattle (under the Mesta system) was the most suitable use for vast tracts, particularly in the parts of Spain now known as Castilla-La Mancha, Extremadura and Andalusia.
 
Over time, most of the cattle ranches in Spain have given way to agriculture, and the few remaining ranches raise fighting bulls. The Spanish vaquero rider more often than not is working with aggressive and dangerous bulls requiring that his skills are carefully honed and his horse is particularly skilled, athletic and brave.    With many of the large ranches disappearing, doma vaquera has been developed into a competitive sport and art form.


Training & Showing

 My Level of expertise has been training in Intermediate and Showing in Basic Doma Vaquera! I showed Wolf a PRE Andalusian Stallion for Rancho Del Zorro in Punta Gorda Fl. Wolf placed 1st in each of his Basic Doma Vaquera classes. I have several influences in my Classical Riding Nuno Oliveria and Philippe Karl.

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